Author Archives: oldhampartners

Social Action Fund

Social isolation and loneliness is a national priority and is equally so in Oldham with 10% of residents self-identifying as being lonely. That is why we made a commitment to work together to target the root causes of social isolation and loneliness in the Oldham Plan – a collective statement from organisations who serve Oldham, which explains how we can all best serve the place we love and help its people and places to thrive.

As part of this commitment, the Thriving Communities programme made a total fund of £850k available to fund up to five projects over a three year period that can enable people to become more socially connected.

Who can apply for the social action fund?

Applications are open to voluntary, community and faith groups/organisations working on their own or in partnership with others organisations (e.g. an alliance model of smaller or medium organisations).

Those applying will be able to demonstrate how their project can improve the lives of residents, show how the outcomes support the reduction on demand in the health and care systems, build community capacity to deliver the goals and priorities linked to the development of Oldham’s Integrated Care Organisation’s (ICO / Oldham Cares) transformation plan and meet the wider strategic objectives of the Oldham Plan.

Case study

Street Angels were awarded money to continue the already excellent work taking place in Oldham town centre on Saturday evenings and expanding into Friday nights. Teams of volunteers and medical staff are there to support those enjoying Oldham’s nightlife providing a listening ear, first aid and basic medical treatment as well as making sure people get home safely. As part of the programme, an evening drop-in and hot meals will be provided for people on the streets as well as future options for daytime support from the Street Angels centre.

Oldham Play Action Group and Wifi NW were also awarded money; the group provide all-age cookery courses to bring children, parents, carers and older socially isolated people together to prepare and cook meals. The groups, run by Oldham Play Action Group (OPAG) and Wifi North West, will also encourage people to engage in active physical play as well as organise community play street events to join neighbourhoods together.

Fast Grants

Central to the Thriving Communities Programme is our Fast Grants project.

What is a fast grant?

The Thriving Communities Programme is awarding fast grants which is a small amount of money, to an individual resident or a community group who have a great idea and require a small pot of money to deliver something at a local level which will build community capacity without introducing barriers or the unnecessary bureaucracy associated with many grant funding structures.

The aim is to encourage communities to work in an asset based way and to focus on what is strong within a community, to build on existing best practice and to try something new.

Some examples of what fast grants can be used for are as follows –
• Art and craft materials for a local group to set up and run a weekly craft group
• Groups to do photocopying to advertise their activities
• Refreshments for sessions

This fund is available to both constituted and non-constituted groups.  Each grant should be between £50 – £500. Higher amounts can be awarded, but will require additional review.

These grants are for the rapid delivery of small actions that will have tangible benefits and support the programmes outcomes e.g. funds for a service user day trip or refurbishing a room to bring it back into use. It will be a resource available to constituted and non-constituted groups.

We know these types of activity will make a real difference, enable dynamic decisions and build trust and also relieve pressure in the system. Given the small nature of these grants and the large volume of them, we will capture the benefit and narrative from these grants in qualitative ways and replay the good news stories into the system to demonstrate the positive impact this has on Oldham people’s lives.

Case Study
Buzy Bees were successful with their application for a Fast Grant of £300 to set up a sensory group on Fitton hill aimed at children under 18 months old with the aim of helping the parents to attend a positive group with their child/children. The group would enable the children to interact with other children and the parents will be able to socialise with other parents. The weekly group will promote positive mental health, support with parenting issues, and give parents an enjoyable engaging experience.

Many people have attended the groups and occasionally the group struggled to find rooms big enough to accommodate the number of people and the equipment. The feedback received from attendees was very positive and many went on to attend the different groups and some parents have asked about volunteering at the sessions.

Here is what some of the members had to say:

“The crafts are great memories that we keep. Gets me and my baby out of the house and socialising”

“Pearl and I had a great time today at our first group! Great mix of play and craft. Hope to come back again. Thank you”

“Really enjoyed, Ernie loved the sensory toys. Really enjoyable. Deffo come again”

“Love the lights and music for my little one. It’s good for my 3 month old to enjoy”

“Always lots to do and my babies have fun. Fab group”

Place Based Integration

How we’re transforming our neighbourhoods and public services 

To build resilient and co-operative services and thriving communities, we know we need to achieve sustainable change and we know that we have to fundamentally rethink: the way the public sector operate, and the relationship with communities, how we work with individuals and families with complex problems, how we connect with the community to both develop community connectedness and build confidence.

Place Based Integration initiatives can help us deliver real change to our communities and transform public services in our neighbourhoods. Place based initiatives, multi-agency teams are key to the transformation and reform of public services and communities both here in Oldham and across Greater Manchester.

Case Study of a Place Based site:

Holts and Lees is an example of how Place Based Initiatives have supported residents in that community. It is led by First Choice Homes and the area covers around 3100 properties. It was chosen due to the high levels of demand on services, particularly in Holts.

The team was modelled on the presenting demand for the area and was initially made up of 9 full time and 2 part time posts as follows: GMP (x3 including NBO and PCSO’s), First Choice Homes (x4 including tenancy, community development, neighbourhoods officers and team leader), OMBC (x2 including family support and early help workers) and Positive Steps (1x early help worker). The team has since drawn in CRC, Focussed Care and a Redeeming our Communities worker from the community and voluntary sector.

Holts and Lees is the most developed of all the PBI sites and has delivered far reaching outcomes for people, places and public services.

Outcomes of PBI for Holts and Lees

Engagement levels are high at over 95% and trust levels are extremely high. This is shown in the high level of self-referrals and how many customers are coming to the team for help via the front door of the hub.

The casework shows direct outcomes for people. In the 67 open cases the financial situation of individuals and families improved in 44% of all the cases. In some cases this improvement was significant and in two cases amounted to £15,900 per year. In just 12 months the financial improvement of just 30 cases amounts to £95,903 and over 70% of these costs are not ‘one off’ and may be realised year on year.

There are social benefits too. In 20% of all cases the team has directed people into activity that has helped to tackle social isolation and loneliness (the Oldham average for social isolation/loneliness is 10%). We know that being socially isolated or lonely is as damaging as smoking 14 cigarettes a day and costs at least £600 a year to public services.

We are actively developing our various Place Based Sites, working with our partner organisations and communities to make a real difference to the lives of residents and transform and shape our public services and assets for our neighbourhoods.

Oldham Social Prescribing Innovation Partnership is a finalist in the 2020 LGC Awards

Oldham Social Prescribing Innovation Partnership is a finalist in the upcoming 2020 LGC Awards and is up for winning the award for best Public/Public Partnership award. This award is open to two or more public sector bodies working together to highlight a more seamless, efficient and integrated service way of working together.

The Oldham Social Prescribing Innovation Partnership is a pioneering three-year Innovation Partnership on behalf of Oldham Cares (our integrated care organisation) to a local consortium of voluntary and community organisations.

This Innovation Partnership is thought to be one of the first for the public sector in England. The commissioning model draws power from the social value act and focuses on innovating and iterating the service model through coproduction with partners and residents to get the best service and offer possible to meet resident’s needs.

The idea originated from a partnership board of community organisations and public sector partners including Health, Local Government, Police and Housing providers who wanted to change the way we support our residents and drew from national best practice and cutting-edge thinking to meet the challenge of health outcomes and wellbeing with a different mindset and thinking about ‘more than medical support’.

The consortia of voluntary, community faith and social enterprise (VCFSE) partners works in partnership with the local health and care arena specifically – Oldham Cares, Oldham Council, Action Together (lead), Mind, Age UK, Positive Steps and Altogether Better.

The Partnership is focusing on developing social prescribing – specifically linking in residents/patients who have ‘more than medical’ needs e.g. social isolation, loneliness, low level mental health or physical health (they may want to join a walking group or a coffee morning for depression) or just wanting to better navigate other parts of wider public system such as welfare. The objectives of the partnership are to; improve the health and wellbeing for people in Oldham through ‘more than medical’ care and support, build upon community capacity, reduce pressure on the health and care system and system learning.

Case Study:

Rani is 27 years old, has a 1yr old, and is pregnant, moved to Oldham from India when she married her husband 3 years ago, and has recently lost her husband. Rani visited the GP several times about low mood and physical aches and pains. Sensing this was more than just medical issues at play here, the GP in Oldham West referred Rani the Social Prescribing partnership. Rani is now accessing community bereavement support, knit and natter women’s sewing groups, stay and play’s all to help reducing her social isolation, and is accessing parent and toddler activities. Rani’s next steps are enrolling on a lifelong learning course and exploring employment opportunities with Get Oldham Working.
This is positive change we need to continue making for people in Oldham.

Growing the New Economy: co-operative & social enterprise place-based innovation

On Wednesday 12th February, E3M are hosting a conference at the Queen Elizabeth Hall.

This conference will bring together an exciting mix of key decision makers from local authorities, health and other local public institutions, leaders of co-operatives and social enterprises with funders and investors to explore how the social economy can play a much more central role in the economic and community wellbeing of places across the country.

Participants will explore key learning and experience about what has worked in different places, and shape a future vision for place-based, co-operative and social enterprise innovation, supporting clear, viable alternatives to the traditional economic models and policies that have failed to serve people and communities in so many parts of the UK.

The event will have a special focus on collaboration and knowledge sharing about new approaches to local economic development and organising local services based on social sourcing, i.e. public benefit partnerships between co-operatives and/or social enterprises and public authorities.

 

 

 

 

Oldham’s Local Wealth Building Programme

A group of Oldham’s main institutions including the council have pledged to work together to build local wealth in the borough.

The Council, Hospital, College, Housing providers, Police and the Leisure Trust will ensure their collective spend, assets and wealth are used to benefit local people

This means buying the good and services they need from local businesses, employing local people, working in partnership with the voluntary sector and social enterprises and becoming Living Wage employers.

Oldham already has a great starting point.

The Council spends 55% of all goods and services in the Oldham economy thanks to a social value ethos introduced when it first became a co-operative council.

We plan to increase this to 60% in the next year and 63% the year after. That will equate to an extra £16 million extra going back into Oldham economy.

66% of all Council spend also goes to small and medium sized enterprises and we also want to ensure the community, voluntary and social enterprise sector benefit. This work is therefore supported by a thriving communities programme that backs the development of social action and infrastructure.

72% of Oldham’s suppliers have created employment opportunities in the borough and we aim to increase the social value element further.

Other partners are also doing their bit and have agreed to have a stronger emphasis on employing local people including from our poorest and most underrepresented areas.

For example, Oldham Hospital (Northern Care Alliance) has pledged to increase the number of Oldham residents they employ by 200 people (5%). They also want to increase the average wage earnings and get more Oldham residents to break the £30,000 wage ceiling. They are working closely with Oldham College to identify how local young people can gain the skills to help them develop careers at the Hospital.

Oldham Leisure Trust employs 79% of Oldham residents and has a good success rate in employing people from across all parts of the borough.

Greater Manchester Police has also made great strides in employing new recruits from across Oldham’s communities.

Together we want to ‘grow our own’ public service workforce and create career pipelines from the Colleges through to employers.

There are other ways that partners can contribute too.

Oldham Council are a Living Wage employer and we can encourage our suppliers to pay the Living Wage and be good employer too.

We are also doing more as a collective to reduce our carbon footprint and become single use plastic free.

Only by working as one Team Oldham will we begin to build a fairer economic system.

Cllr Sean Fielding, Leader of Oldham Council

Growing the New Economy: co-operative & social enterprise place-based innovation

On Wednesday 12th February, E3M are hosting a conference at the Queen Elizabeth Hall.

This conference will bring together an exciting mix of key decision makers from local authorities, health and other local public institutions, leaders of co-operatives and social enterprises with funders and investors to explore how the social economy can play a much more central role in the economic and community wellbeing of places across the country.

Participants will explore key learning and experience about what has worked in different places, and shape a future vision for place-based, co-operative and social enterprise innovation, supporting clear, viable alternatives to the traditional economic models and policies that have failed to serve people and communities in so many parts of the UK.

The event will have a special focus on collaboration and knowledge sharing about new approaches to local economic development and organising local services based on social sourcing, i.e. public benefit partnerships between co-operatives and/or social enterprises and public authorities.

Oldham Food Network

What is it?

The Oldham Food Network:

  • Is a community-led organisation – run by local people, for local people
  • Brings together groups from communities across Oldham involved in food activity
  • Engages members borough-wide

What do our members do?

Why does this help?

Through the work of our members, the network helps to:

  • Improve individual and community resilience
  • Increase healthy eating and health outcomes
  • Tackle social isolation 
  • Make healthy food a choice for residents
  • Support enterprise around food
  • Reduce food insecurity

What have we done?

Since establishment, the Network has grown from a group of volunteers into an active movement, driving Oldham’s co-operative approach to food and growing and supporting a range of people and projects. 

In December 2016, the Network led a successful crowdfunding campaign for a Community Kitchen for Oldham Foodbank.  Through a myriad of fundraising activity, over £20,000 was raised in under 8 weeks, successfully galvanising support and investment from residents, partners, businesses and organisations across the borough.  The collaborative approach to community involvement created a swell of interest and support that continues to grow beyond the campaign.

What we’d like to achieve

We have five ambitions priorities we focus on:

  1. To co-ordinate food activity and support local communities (growing, cooking, sharing – and eating!)
  2. To increase food education and skills
  3. To grow food enterprise in Oldham
  4. To communicate opportunities and share resources around food
  5. To eradicate food waste

How do we achieve this?

Key to what we can achieve is:

  • By working co-operatively with partners
  • Through exploring joint opportunities
  • Supporting shared ambitions
  • Sharing knowledge and experiences
  • Communicating with others

What next?

Through connecting, joint-working, sharing and action we are empowering leaders across Oldham to drive a movement around the future of food. 

The Network is also moving towards establishing an entity to help increase sustainability, and seek and secure funding and investment to increase communications, marketing and activity that makes a difference. 

By empowering a Network for all Oldham, we are fostering a culture of collaboration by default. 

The Green Oldham Campaign – are you green for Oldham?

The Green Oldham campaign launched in June 2018 and aims to engage residents in thinking about how they can be more green.  The campaign covers topics from air quality, energy and environmental education to food growing, recycling, parks and single-use plastics. 

To find out more, see our video playlist below or visit www.oldham.gov.uk/GreenOldham

Springboard to Achieving New Environmental Vision for Greater Manchester Agreed

Ambitious plans to make Greater Manchester one of the leading green city-regions in the UK and Europe were approved on 27 July 2018.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, together with local leaders, are aiming to bring Greater Manchester’s date for achieving carbon neutrality forward by at least a decade to 2038. Not only is this a globally leading standard, it is based on a science based approach.

The Mayor of Greater Manchester, Andy Burnham, said: “Greater Manchester was at the heart of the industrial revolution, a leading contributor of green-house gases. The city led the computer revolution which changed our lives. Now we are leading the low carbon revolution which will form the next chapter of how we live, work and travel. The science is clear on the steps we need to take to become carbon neutral, and some of these are very challenging. But our ambitions are high and we need communities and businesses to work with us to make this happen.”

“Our vision will not only make us a global leader for smart energy innovation, but will transform Greater Manchester into a world-leading greener, cleaner city region, improving the health and quality of life for millions of people and protecting our green spaces and environment for future generations.”

Read more about this on www.greatermanchster-ca.gov.uk